File Watcher – auto save back to Salesforce

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The Sforce blog just posted about a tool called File Watcher, created by engineer Steve Buikhuizen of Salesforce.

Per the blog post:

When working with Salesforce data, there are many times when you need to edit records using an editor on your PC. You can do this by copying the data to a local file and then saving back to Salesforce when you’re finished. A good example of this is when you are configuring the PRM portal with your own branding and making little changes to the header, footer, etc.

But what if you need to save back to Salesforce repetitively? In this case, the cut/paste process can take up a lot of time. Now there is a better way. Use a “watcher”… These tools allow you to edit fields, documents and s-controls using any editor. When you save locally, the watcher will save the file back to Salesforce. Simple.

I haven’t tried it yet, but I will soon. Check it out at http://www.buikhuizen.com/watcher/. There is a separate watcher for Fields, Files (Documents) and S-Controls (if you use the Eclipse plug-in, then you don’t need it for S-controls)

Per Steve’s site,

These tools are open source projects, not supported by Salesforce.com.

4 Comments »

  1. Sandra Said,

    September 20, 2006 @ 11:18 am

    I am not clear about how you would use file watcher, even after looking at the link. Is it for the general user in day-to-day work or just for developer types.

    S

  2. Scott Hemmeter Said,

    September 20, 2006 @ 11:41 am

    Sandra: It is probably more for developer-types. Developers have a tendency to be particular about the editors they use for certain tasks. This is just a nice thing that would eliminate a step or 2.

    I can’t think of too many realistic scenarios where a regular user would want to use this.

  3. Gareth Davies Said,

    September 20, 2006 @ 2:57 pm

    I can see why this would be good for editing S-controls, would be a nice feature.

  4. Steve Buikhuizen Said,

    September 20, 2006 @ 3:27 pm

    Sandra : Scott is exactly right, these tools are intended for Salesforce/Appexchange developers and administrators. I haven’t heard of a use case for a regular user although I wouldn’t be surprised if someone pointed one out.

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